In Buddhist history the word silence corresponds to right view: seeing impermanence, the truth that everything is appearing, disappearing, and changing from moment to moment. Impermanence is not something you see objectively—it is something you taste directly. Then impermanence makes you silent, because impermanence is very quiet. That silence connects you with a deep sense of human value.
Silence is not just being silent. You are silent, but simultaneously there are many words, many explanations, and many representations there. Dynamic actions, both physical and mental, are there. In other words, silence is something deep and also very active. In Japanese the word for this silence is mokuraiMoku means “silence” and rai means “thunder.” So silence is quiet, but there is an enormous voice like thunder there.
Dainin Katagiri
Each Moment is the Universe (Boston: Shambhala, 2007), 63
Permalink | | Posted in Quotes
Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links on this website are “affiliate links.” If you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. I only recommend products or services I believe will benefit my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”